3 Signs of a Foundation Problem in Your Commercial Building / Commercial Property Maintenance / Enhance Services Melbourne

As a commercial property owner, safeguarding the structure of your building is crucial if you want to avoid ongoing problems and expensive repairs. Foundation issues can be a common cause of problems and if they are not picked up early enough they can even impact the safety of your building and tenants.

Any good property maintenance expert will know the signs that your foundations are not as solid as they should be. Early detection means you can take action to remedy the issue in time, before a minor problem turns into a major headache.

Here are three signs that could indicate your commercial building has a problem with the foundations:

  1. Cracks in walls. Cracking in exterior or interior walls can be an indication that your foundations are shifting. Also, gaps between the fascia and roof areas can be a clear sign that you have an issue with your foundation. Cracks can also appear for other reasons like humidity and weather damage but they are always worth checking out sooner rather than later.
  2. Doors and windows that don’t open properly. If your doors or windows have always opened and closed smoothly and they suddenly get stuck or need more elbow grease than before to open and close this can also be an indication that foundations are moving and putting things out of line.
  3. Warped floors. Your building’s floor is directly above the foundation so any issues with flooring can mean a problem further down. Indications can include warping or buckling of wooden floors, cracking of ceramic tiles and bunched up linoleum. It’s always worth checking it out if you or your tenants spot anything amiss with the flooring.

Good property maintenance takes a proactive approach to problems. By taking the time to check for damage and acting on any possible signs of foundation problems, you can help ensure your building stays sound for longer and reduce repair costs in the future.

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